Careless Driving

As I suggested in my previous blog, never plead guilty to careless driving (unless pleading down from a Criminal Code offence). Although a conviction for careless driving is not a criminal record, it does carry serious penalties. More importantly, the […]

January 22nd, 2019|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|

Bail Hearing

Under section 11(e) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, any person charged with an offence has the right “not to be denied reasonable bail without just cause”.  Once a person has been arrested and charged, the police can either release him from the police station […]

October 17th, 2017|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|

Plea Bargaining in Criminal Court

Let me repeat what I said in an earlier blog. In criminal court, a guilty plea is generally given greater weight the earlier it is entered into. There are three reasons for that. First, an early plea shows remorse – an indication that the accused is on […]

July 26th, 2016|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|

How to deal with police at the roadside (traffic stops)

police car in rearview mirror in the rain

Every police car is equipped with a computerized mobile workstation (“MWS”), aka mobile data terminal (“MDT”). In seconds, police can learn a great deal about you without stopping you. How? By entering your plate in their MWS. If you have […]

February 22nd, 2016|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|

Plea Bargaining in Traffic Court

I don’t practice in traffic court very much anymore, mostly because the penalties at stake for defendants don’t justify the legal fees. As a former Assistant Crown Attorney, I once did a six-month stint prosecuting traffic court. The procedure hasn’t changed much since then.

In criminal court, a guilty plea is generally given greater weight the […]

January 25th, 2016|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|

The Right To Silence

Screen Shot 2016-01-18 at 4.55.47 PM
There is no absolute right to silence in Canada. For example, if you are involved in a motor vehicle accident in Ontario, you may be required to provide details to the investigating officer. If you are charged for professional misconduct, you may […]

January 11th, 2016|Categories: Bill Reid's Blog|